The Curated Closet

By: Anushka Reese

With so many styles and shopping options, it can be difficult to create a streamlined closet of pieces that can be worn easily and confidently. In The Curated Closet, style writer Anuschka Rees presents a strategic approach to identifying, refining, and expressing personal style and building the ideal wardrobe to match it, with style and shopping strategies that you can use every day. Using The Curated Closet method, you’ll learn to:
·         Shop smarter and more selectively
·         Make the most of your budget
·         Master outfit formulas and colour palettes
·         Tweak your wardrobe for work
·         Assess garment fit and quality like a pro
·         Curate a closet of fewer, better pieces

 

I would recommend this book to any person who really wants to level up their wardrobe organization ability.

 

Summary PDF >

5 Key Takeaways

  1. Be selective: Reserve your closet space for items you love 100 percent

    • Training yourself to become more selective is the single most effective thing you can do to upgrade your wardrobe. Try to think of your closet as an exclusive, members-only club. Only pieces that you love and are truly excited to wear get an invite. Anything ill-fitting, scratchy, worn-out, barely “good enough,” or that simply doesn’t suit your personal style is not invited.

    • If what you wear is important to you, not being able to find anything you truly love will affect your confidence levels eventually, and that’s stressful too.
       

  2. Like music, architecture, and literature, fashion is a form of art and an important part of human culture that reflects both bigger cultural shifts and smaller movements (such as seasonal trends). Now, what separates fashion from many other art forms is that it is much more prevalent in everyday life. In that sense, it is perhaps most comparable to music, another art form that most people have an opinion about. But unlike with clothes, you wouldn’t make yourself listen to songs all day just because they are at the top of the charts right now or because a “hip” person told you to, right? Of course not; you listen to music that you like. And that’s exactly what it should be like with fashion as well.
     

  3. Glossy billboards, highly produced celebrity-driven ads, and clever social media campaigns are everywhere, and stylish clothing is now more accessible and affordable than ever. This is a dangerous combination that has had quite the impact on our spending habits
     

  4. Why do discounts work so well? Because they tap right into our inherent fear of scarcity and trigger our instinct to hoard resources whenever we can. That coupled with the fact that time-limited discounts create a sense of urgency puts us straight back into hunter-gatherer mode
     

  5. Our clothes tell a story. Our clothes reflect our personality and what’s important to us. Clothes can also bring you down when they don’t make you feel like yourself. To be comfortable and confident, we need clothes that feel like us.

Notes

Introduction

 

  • I might have had a full closet, but I didn’t have anything to wear that I was actually excited about, and because of that, I always needed more.

  • This book is the culmination of all my research. Think of it as a toolbox full of tips, techniques, exercises, and prompts designed to help you cultivate a strong personal style and build a functional wardrobe that allows you to express it.

 

Chapter 1: The curated closet philosoph

  • 5 Key principles that everything in this book is based on:

    1. Be selective: Reserve your closet space for items you love 100 percent

      • Training yourself to become more selective is the single most effective thing you can do to upgrade your wardrobe. Try to think of your closet as an exclusive, members-only club. Only pieces that you love and are truly excited to wear get an invite. Anything ill-fitting, scratchy, worn-out, barely “good enough,” or that simply doesn’t suit your personal style is not invited.

      • If what you wear is important to you, not being able to find anything you truly love will affect your confidence levels eventually, and that’s stressful too.

    2. Be authentic: Forget conventional style typologies like “classic” or “bohemian” and create your own unique look

      • Style typologies and lists of “wardrobe essentials” are to style seekers what fad diets are to people who want to lose a few pounds: quick-fix,

    3. Aim for quality: Build a wardrobe of high-quality pieces that last more than just a few years

      • Fortunately, my strategy did a complete 180 almost as soon as my goal had shifted from “be fashionable” to “cultivate my own personal style.” 

      • Once you become more selective about what you keep in your closet, you’ll attach a bigger value to each individual piece and will probably no longer be satisfied with cheap, badly manufactured stuff. You’ll want clothes that feel good on your skin. Clothes that are sturdy and durable and that won’t fall apart after a couple of seasons. Clothes that fit the contours of your body well, without distorting your silhouette or restricting movement.

      • Aiming for quality goes hand in hand with building a great wardrobe that expresses your style and supports your life.

    4. Style trumps fashion: Get excited about fashion trends that suit your own style, but ignore all others

    • “keeping up with fashion” suggests that fashion is the equivalent of a law that it is our duty, as respectable people, to uphold. It suggests that the key to dressing well is following the rules and wearing whichever trends and must-haves the fashion world is prescribing that season, regardless of whether we actually like them or not.

    • Like music, architecture, and literature, fashion is a form of art and an important part of human culture that reflects both bigger cultural shifts and smaller movements (such as seasonal trends). Now, what separates fashion from many other art forms is that it is much more prevalent in everyday life. In that sense, it is perhaps most comparable to music, another art form that most people have an opinion about. But unlike with clothes, you wouldn’t make yourself listen to songs all day just because they are at the top of the charts right now or because a “hip” person told you to, right? Of course not; you listen to music that you like. And that’s exactly what it should be like with fashion as well.

    • Just like music, fashion should be about celebrating creativity and having fun.

                5. Put in the work: Invest time and thought into developing your style and selecting the perfect garments

      • Like everything in life, styling takes practice.

  • MINIMALISM AND THE CURATED CLOSET

    • Get rid of everything that doesn’t make you happy or enrich your life to make space for stuff that does.

    • The goal is not to build a wardrobe that is as small as possible but one that is as functional and personalized as possible.

 

 

Chapter 3: What your clothes say about you

  • Here’s a fun fact for you: the average American spends more than 1,100 dollars on clothes each year and buys close to seventy new pieces.

  • Our clothes tell a story. Our clothes reflect our personality and what’s important to us.

  • Clothes can also bring you down when they don’t make you feel like yourself.

  • To be comfortable and confident, we need clothes that feel like us.

 

 

 

Chapter 6: Putting it all together: your style profile

  • Regardless of what’s currently in your wardrobe, having a clear picture of how you ideally would like to dress is a good idea because it gives you a concrete roadmap that you can use to tweak, upgrade, or overhaul your wardrobe step by step.

 

Chapter 7: Closet Detox- The complete guide 

  • Closet Detox Prep : 

    • What you Need

      • •One or two trash bags 

      • Six boxes (or bags)

      • A full-length mirror 

      • A camera (your phone’s is fine) 

      • Some good music, snacks, and stamina

    • LABEL YOUR SEVEN BOXES LIKE THIS:

      • Donate or sell : Any item that doesn’t reflect your personal style, is way too uncomfortable, or does nothing for your confidence doesn’t deserve a spot in your wardrobe.

      • Keepsakes : Collect pieces that have a sentimental value for you in the keepsakes box for now and then find a good permanent spot for them once you’ve completed the detox ( Avoid storing in your Wardrobe )

      • Trash : Anything that’s stained, ripped, or otherwise broken beyond repair belongs in the trash, no exceptions.

      • Trial separation : A great way to reveal your true feelings about pieces you are not sure about is to store them outside of your closet in a separate box for a while, perhaps under your bed. That way, if you truly miss an item, you can easily retrieve it, but chances are, you’ll forget about most of the stuff in there after a couple of weeks and can then confidently get rid of them.

      • Get tailored : Put pieces you would wear if the fit were improved in the tailor box, and take them to a tailor after you’re done with the detox.

      • Repair : Always keep a mini sewing kit on hand so you can take care of basic repairs yourself, like fixing undone seams or loose buttons.

      • Off-season storage : This one is optional, but consider creating some extra breathing room in your closet by storing off-season clothes somewhere else.

 

Chapter 8: How to build a wardrobe that fits your life

  • Fashion is a form of art, and you want your clothes to look good, sure, but you also need them to be feel good and be practical because you spend your life in them.

  • A two-step life analysis 

    1. Write a list of every activity you do in an average two weeks. Include everything from lounging at home to meeting clients for dinner at fancy restaurants. On your list, include an estimate of how many days out of two weeks you typically need an outfit for each activity,

      • Example: 3 Gym, 7 Work, 1 Conference, 1 Hiking, 2 Going out 

    2. Create categories of activities for which you can wear the same type of outfits and add up the number of times you’ll need an outfit for each category ( Basically move these from sub-categories -> categories )

  • Questions to ask ourselves

    • •What weather condition and general temperature should a piece from this category be tailored to? 

    • What is the climate like where you live? 

    • Will you be indoors or outdoors? 

    • Do you get hot or cold easily? 

    • Does a piece from this category need to conform to a special dress code? 

    • Think standard business attire, smart casual, covering tattoos or piercings, black-tie, white-tie, and so on. •For shoes, how much walking will you be doing? What heel height do you prefer? 

    • For bags, what type of things will you be carrying with this piece? What size, weight, and internal structure would be ideal? 

    • For all your clothes, to what level of maintenance are you prepared to commit? If a weekly trip to the dry cleaner does not fit into your budget or busy schedule, don’t buy anything that you can’t just

 

 

Chapter 9: Closet Competition 

  • The idea of strategy number one is to make sure your closet contains a balanced mix of three types of items: 

    • 1. Key pieces that really signify the essence of your style and that you can wear in lots of different ways 

    • 2. Statement pieces that add variety to your looks and help you express different facets of your style 

    • 3. Basics that balance out bolder pieces and give the rest of your pieces a neutral backdrop

  • Working with a threefold structure like this has lots of benefits: 

    • It is a fail-proof way to ensure that every new piece you buy fulfills a clear role and will fit into the larger framework of your wardrobe.

    • It helps you curate a balanced closet by preventing you from buying only statement pieces or blowing your entire budget on six versions of the same T-shirt.

    • It’s a fast track to making sure your wardrobe contains plenty of outfit options for any mood or occasion and is well balanced along the entire spectrum from dressed down to dressed up. Do you need an outfit for a super-fancy dinner party? Build an outfit that consists solely of statement pieces. Do you want to look casual but polished? Wear a couple of key pieces with basic shoes. Want to wear a statement top and your favorite heels during the day? Pair them with basic pants and minimal accessories. Easy peasy.

  • KEY PIECES : Your key pieces are the workhorses of your wardrobe.They reflect the look and feel of your personal style 100 percent and are ultra versatile and optimally tailored to your lifestyle. The perfect key pieces for your style are neither particularly bold nor plain but smack-dab in the middle of what you consider dressed up versus dressed down.

    • TYPICAL KEY PIECES Jackets and outerwear; pants; skirts; shoes; bags; versatile tops

  • STATEMENT PIECES : Statement pieces don’t have to be quite as mixable as the rest of your wardrobe, but as a rule of thumb, each piece should still work as part of at least three different outfits.

    • TYPICAL STATEMENT PIECES Bold shoes, jewelry, and other accessories; tops, dresses, pants, and skirts in bolder colors or with unique details

    • BUDGETING STRATEGY : Since you’ll likely get the least amount of wear out of your statement pieces, don’t spend more on them than necessary. You want your pieces to look great and fit well, sure, but they don’t necessarily have to last you more than a couple of years. Save your money for your key pieces instead.

  • BASICS : Your basics’ job is to support and balance out the rest of your pieces. They can tone down a bold look and give other pieces a neutral foundation to stand on. And they can also be used to fill in any gaps (for example, when you know your statement dress will run the show for the night but you still need a pair of shoes to wear).

    • TYPICAL BASIC PIECES Tops; T-shirts; jeans; and plain pants, skirts, and shoes

    • BUDGETING STRATEGY: Since your basics will likely be less structured and detailed than your other pieces, you should be able to find high-quality versions at all price points. An exception here are more structured pieces like blazers or jeans, which depend on an exact fit.

  • Adding your wardrobe: 

    • STEP 1 How balanced is your current wardrobe? Does it contain a good mix of key pieces, basics, and statement pieces? Or too little of one, not enough of the other?

    • STEP 2 Go back over the list of key pieces, basics, and statement pieces that you made during the last few exercises and compare it to your current wardrobe. Cross out any items that you already own (or a similar version of it).

 

Chapter 10: Selecting a versatile color palette

  • Building a color palette is the second of three strategies that works great for mapping out your ideal wardrobe. It is a super fun exercise that gives you a concrete blueprint you can use to curate a cohesive wardrobe that’s easy to mix and match. Your color palette will also help you out when it comes to putting together outfits that are 100 percent in tune with your style.

  • What makes a great color palette? A few things: Your color palette should consist of six to twelve colors that work well with each other and reflect your style. On top of that, each color in your palette should have a clear function, depending on the role you want it to play in your wardrobe.

    • MAIN COLORS :Your main colors are the equivalent of your favorite style colors. What colors do you love to wear? Which colors aren’t you wearing yet that you want to play a major role in your wardrobe? The only caveat is that all main colors should be ones that you can see yourself wearing a lot and that you feel super comfortable in.

    • ACCENT COLORS Your accent shades add variety to your look and give you a chance to explore different facets of your style.

    • NEUTRAL COLORS The neutral shades in your color palette are there to support and balance out the other colors. Obvious choices for neutrals are white, black, gray, navy, and sand, and all washes of denim.

  • You can use your color palette like a blueprint to build up a wardrobe that not only reflects your style but is also super mixable.

    • First, you need to identify which colors are still missing from your current wardrobe and to what extent

    • Then, when it comes to writing a shopping list for your wardrobe overhaul, you can specify roughly how many pieces you still need in each color and what your priorities are.

 

Chapter 11: Working with outfit formulas 

  • What’s an outfit formula? It’s a recipe for a specific combination of items that you can wear in lots of different versions.

  • The idea is that you choose a few outfit formulas that reflect your style and which you feel confident wearing and then curate several different pieces that you can mix and match for each ingredient of your outfit formulas.

  • How to select outfit formulas?

    • STEP 1: LOOK AT WHAT OUTFIT FORMULAS YOU ARE ALREADY WEARING 

    • STEP 2: FIND OUTFIT FORMULAS THAT REFLECT YOUR IDEAL STYLE

    • STEP 3: CHOOSE YOUR FAVORITE OUTFIT FORMULAS TO GET STARTED

  • The reason we usually run out of clothes is rarely because we literally have no clean clothes left, but because we are missing one single component, usually underwear or a top, or anything that needs a wash sooner than pieces like skirts or jackets.

  • The easy solution: Make sure you have more of those pieces in your closet. And, if you want to be precise, use outfit formulas that give you all the information you need to calculate exactly how many more! Let’s say one of your outfit formulas is jeans + T-shirt + cardigan, just to keep it really simple. For each formula ingredient, figure out how many times you can usually wear a piece before it needs to be washed.

 

Chapter 12: Business Hours: Tweaking Your Wardrobe For Work 

  • Criteria for your work wardrobe 

    • •It makes you look and feel professional and gives you confidence for presentations, meetings, or talks with the boss. 

    • It is 100 percent comfortable and functional, so you can concentrate on your work without having to worry about straps that dig in or a skirt that rides up. 

    • It should respect the company’s dress code (spoken or unspoken) and culture yet still reflect your own personal style.

  • Corporate Jobs

    • Focus on finding a few versatile, high-quality key pieces that could work as the framework of your wardrobe. Think tailored pants, skirts, a couple of blazers, and a few comfortable (!) pairs of shoes. Since your options are somewhat limited here in regard to the type of pieces you can choose, make it a point to get the details— fit, material, and color— right.

    • If chosen right, twenty pieces could be all you need (for example, three blazers, three pairs of pants, three skirts, eight tops, and three pairs of shoes).

  • Smart Casual 

    • Your basic strategy will be to curate a selection of more formal key pieces to pair with your regular clothes.

    • For people with full-time jobs in a smart-casual work environment, I generally recommend a three-section wardrobe structure: 

      • Section 1: Double-duty pieces you can wear to work and your personal life. 

      • Section 2: Free-time pieces that you can’t wear for work, that are only for weekends and evenings. 

      • Section 3: More formal “add-on” pieces that you specifically buy for the job to pair with your pieces from section 1

  • Working from home: 

    • Even if you work from home, you will likely have to leave the house from time to time for client meetings and work-related events, so make sure you have a few dressier outfits sitting in your closet for those occasions.

 

Chapter 13: Overhauling your wardrobe: a step by step roadmap 

  • Some pieces in your dream wardrobe will have a bigger impact on your ability to express your style than others, for example, a great blazer that really signifies your style and that you can wear with everything, or a versatile pair of shoes in one of your main colors that also fills a glaring gap in your wardrobe. The trick is to identify these pieces and buy them first. That way, no matter your budget, every dollar you spend has the biggest possible immediate effect on your wardrobe.

  • The four-step overhaul:

    1. STEP 1: GET A COMPLETE OVERVIEW OF EVERYTHING YOU STILL NEED (Page 160)

    2. STEP 2: TURN VAGUE IDEAS INTO CONCRETE PIECES

    3. STEP 3: ORGANIZE YOUR LIST BY PRIORITY (Ask yourself the following questions)

      • How big of an impact will this piece have on my ability to create outfits that express my style?

        • •Key pieces (over basics and statement pieces) 

        • Pieces in main colors (over accent colors, neutrals, or colors that are not a part of your color palette) 

        • Pieces that are a part of one of your outfit formulas (over pieces that aren’t)

      • How big is the gap that this piece would fill?

        • •Pieces for activities and occasions that are currently underrepresented in your closet 

        • Pieces of colours that are missing from your wardrobe (over ones in a colour already represented by a couple of items in your closet) 

        • Pieces of outfit formula ingredients you don’t own, or have only one of (over pieces you already own a couple of)

    4. STEP 4: OVERHAUL YOUR WARDROBE ONE ITEM AT A TIME

 

Chapter 16: How to shop like a conscious consumer?

  • Glossy billboards, highly produced celebrity-driven ads, and clever social media campaigns are everywhere, and stylish clothing is now more accessible and affordable than ever. This is a dangerous combination that has had quite the impact on our spending habits:

  • The online world is so saturated with ads and brand messages, it’s impossible to escape. And so most of us spend our days surrounded by pretty pictures of stuff and glamorous people talking about that stuff. Over time that constant exposure changes our own perception of what’s normal and we ourselves get used to buying more and more without thinking about it too much.

  • Escaping the Cycle

    • The way you shop is nothing but a set of habits you have picked up over the years. And if you want to change the way you shop and become more selective and thoughtful about what you buy and what goes into your wardrobe, then you need to gradually replace those habits with some new ones.

    • 3 Key Habits:

      1. Habit 1: Write a detailed shopping list: Get in the habit of deciding what you want to buy before you hit the shops, online or in person at a brick-and-mortar store.

        • A normal person eventually takes home the items that caught their attention, what was on sale, what the nice sales assistant talked them into, and how many stores they made it to until their feet started to hurt.

      • Habit 2: Take It slow: By deliberately taking it slow, you are giving yourself the chance to be thorough and make sure you aren’t rushing your decision or acting on impulse.

      • HABIT 3: PAY ATTENTION TO DETAILS: Training yourself to pay attention to details like the fit, fabric composition, or neckline of an item is such an important step toward building a better wardrobe.

 

Chapter 17: Decision Time: When to buy and when to keep looking

  • Put together a little checklist of everything you want to consider before buying something new, from the overall style to its quality and price point, and then just run through it point by point.

  • Advantages of having a checklist:

    1. It helps you make sure you have really considered a piece from all angles. Under pressure, it’s so easy to cut corners and focus exclusively on the visual characteristics of a piece and ignore things like the fit, fabric, or quality, all of which could be potential deal breakers.

    2. It helps take some of the emotion out of the decision and makes it more objective and thereby less susceptible to outside pressure or your random mood.

  • Questions to ask yourself before buying a new item:

    1. STYLE :

      1. Does this piece reflect my personal style? 

      2. Do I like how it looks on my body?

    2. FUNCTION :

      1. Can I think of a clear role for this item within my wardrobe? 

      2. Does it work with my lifestyle, and so I know exactly which type of activities I could wear it for? 

      3. Is it fixable?

    3. QUALITY :

      1. Does it fit well and is it comfortable? 

      2. Is the garment well-constructed and made from a high-quality material? 

      3. Am I prepared to properly take care of this item?

    4. BUDGET :

      1. Will this piece fill a gap in my wardrobe or only add to an already overrepresented area? 

      2. Is buying this piece a good use of my budget, or would a different item make a bigger impact on my wardrobe right now?

      3. Do I want to buy this because it’s on sale or I need a pick-me-up, want to celebrate, or am just plain bored?

    5. GUT Do you really love this piece and are you excited to wear it?

      1. Can I think of at least three concrete outfits I could create with this piece that I would be excited to wear? 

      2.  Can I see myself wearing this for many seasons?

 

Chapter 18: How to stop overspending and make the most of your budget 

  • How to make the most of your budget :

    • Using whatever money you have to spend wisely by prioritizing pieces that will have a big impact on your wardrobe 

    • Not blowing money on random pieces because you are stressed, sad, bored, or want to celebrate

  • Why we usually overspend : 

    • TO RELIEVE STRESS OR REWARD OURSELVES

    • TO HAVE FUN AND PASS THE TIME

    • OUT OF UNCERTAINTY OR A LACK OF CONFIDENCE

  • To avoid impulsive buys, just delay the time in between you see something and when you buy it so you can think it through

  • Why do discounts work so well? Because they tap right into our inherent fear of scarcity and trigger our instinct to hoard resources whenever we can. That coupled with the fact that time-limited discounts create a sense of urgency puts us straight back into hunter-gatherer mode

 

 

Chapter 19: Assessing garment quality: A beginners guide 

  • You need to be able to tell the difference between a durable, well-crafted piece and one that looks pretty on the rack but won’t last more than a few washes.

    • Which properties distinguish high-quality garments from low-quality ones 

    • How to spot these properties when you’re out shopping.

  • We want our clothes to feel good on the skin so we can enjoy wearing them instead of wanting to take them off as soon as we get home. And lastly, we also want our clothes to look like high-quality garments— smooth fabric, neat seams, beautiful detailing— not something that is about to fall apart.

  • Pretty much every shopper makes purchasing decisions baed on what a garment looks like; only a very few will take the time to assess the seams or the quality of the tailoring.

  • Important factors in different garments:

    • Fabric: The hands-down most important component of a garment is its fabric. 

      • COTTON: it’s soft, versatile, durable (when high quality), washable, and comparatively affordable.

        • Steps to find a good piece: 

          • •Touch it! Even cotton fabric that is sturdy, thick, or even stiff should feel soft on the skin. If it doesn’t, it was probably made with shorter fibres and will be less durable in the long run. 

          • Check the density of the fabric by holding it up to the light. Even if it is very fine, the fabric should not be transparent. If the fabric lets through a lot of light, it’s a sign that it is not very dense and therefore will not be very durable. 

          • Cotton needs to be spun, so look closely at the threads that make up the fabric. There should be no gaps or size differences between the individual threads. All you should see up close is a regular pattern of smooth rows. 

          • Cotton is an especially good choice when you are shopping at low-end/ budget stores. Some fabrics are hard to get right at the lower end of the price range, but since cotton is comparatively cheap to

      • LINEN: It’s a great fabric for summer, because it is breathable, dries fast, has a cooling effect, and is lint resistant.

        • •Make sure the linen feels comfortable on the skin. Linen is not a soft garment by nature, but if it actually feels scratchy or rough, short/ low-quality fibres were probably used, which come with all the same disadvantages as short cotton fibers. 

        • The one downside to linen is that it is not very elastic (therefore it wrinkles easily) and will eventually rip if it is constantly folded in the same spot. Before you buy, make sure that the linen does not already contain any small permanent creases that can’t be smoothed out. These are likely a sign of a style or cut that creates strong natural folds when you move, and these will only become more pronounced with regular wear. Also, think about whether the item will still look okay when it’s a little wrinkled at the end of the day. 

        • Always check the care instructions before you buy a linen piece. Linen is very prone to shrink, and many linen garments can only be dry cleaned or washed in cold water.

      • WOOL: 

        • Check for any manufacturing faults: the knitting should be consistent and there should not be any knots, loose strands, holes, or gaps between the individual threads of the fabric. One reason for fibre breakage when it comes to wool is that the animal the fibre came from was stressed or malnourished, resulting in a weak or brittle fibre. If you can already see broken fibres on a new garment, chances are they would only multiply with regular wear.

        • Wool fabric should be elastic. It should bounce back immediately when you pull it and not stay stretched out.

        • Unless it’s a part of the design of an item, you should generally not be able to see through the weave. A high-quality wool garment will be tightly woven and dense, without any gaps in between the individual threads.

        • Before you buy a wool item, make sure you test what it feels like, not just on your hands but also on places where your skin is more sensitive, like the inside of your arm, to make sure you like it.

      • Demin: 

        • Denim made from high-quality cotton feels soft and even as if it’s a little moist.

        • Denim should never feel thin and flimsy or so stiff and heavy that you can’t move (unless it is a raw, unwashed piece), but anything in between is fine and a matter of personal choice. If you want to go for a thinner fabric, make sure the yarns are tightly woven and the fabric feels strong and dense, so it won’t tear easily. 

        • When you are buying denim secondhand, always check the inner thighs for rubbing. If there is a lot of visible wear and tear, chances are the quality of the denim fabric is low.

      • LEATHER:

        • A major downside of leather is that it can be permanently creased. When you buy a new piece, make sure it does not already have any scratch marks. On unworn pieces, those usually signify that the leather is either brittle or very high maintenance.

        • Check how the individual pieces of leather are attached. Were they sewn together or glued? Stitching takes longer than glueing and is, therefore, more expensive for brands, but it creates a stronger hold between the pieces. Any visible remains of glue are a definite no-go.

      • VEGAN LEATHER:  High-quality faux leather can be just as durable as real leather, is generally more affordable and easier to maintain, won’t lighten as much in the sun, and doesn’t involve the death of animals.

        • Just like real leather, faux leather should feel supple, not have any obvious scratch marks, and the individual parts of the item should be sewn rather than glued together.

        • Low-quality faux leather will often have an obvious plasticky, shiny look to it; higher quality pieces are almost indistinguishable from animal leather, at least to non-experts.

        • So, avoid shiny; go for soft and supple and, when in doubt, know that thicker tends to be better. Faux leather can be lightweight, but it should never feel thin or flimsy.

 

 

Chapter 20: Practical pointers for finding clothes that fit well

  • Life is too short for uncomfortable clothes

  • Good fitting clothing:

    • hangs on your body just as the designer intended it to

    • feels comfortable and allows you to move freely •stays put without having to be readjusted

    • stays put without having to be readjusted

  • Bad fitting clothing:

    • Looks distorted and may be too tight in some places but too loose in others 

    • digs into your skin feels uncomfortably tight and restricts your movement 

    • slips down, pulls, gaps, wrinkles, or bunches up as you move and needs to be constantly tucked back into place

 

Chapter 21: Maintaining and updating your wardrobe throughout the year 

  • A great closet is one that can grow and evolve alongside you, your style, and your life.

  • 4 Basic maintenance tasks: 

    • Preparing your wardrobe for the upcoming season 

    • Redefining your personal style and incorporating a few new pieces, colours, or silhouettes into your look (optional) 

    • Making sure your wardrobe is well tailored to your lifestyle and your plans for the next few months 

    • Dealing with repairs and replacing broken or worn-out wardrobe essentials

  • Seasonal Changes: 

    • For winter: Do you have enough outerwear, gloves, hats, scarves, warm sweaters, winter boots, and other weather-appropriate pieces in storage or in your closet already?

    • For summer: Do you own enough bikinis, tops, shorts,summer dresses, sandals, and other summer essentials?

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